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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

1                   Short Notes of my Life
1769. April 24. Mrs. Olive spoke an epilogue I had written for her on her quitting the stage. It alluded to Eobert-son's History of Charles the Fifth, then lately published.
May. Mr. David Hume had introduced to me one Diver-dun, a Swiss in the Secretary's office. This man wrote M6moires Litteraires de la Grande Bretagne; and Mr. Hume desired I would give him a copy of Lord Herbert's Life, that he might insert an extract in his journal. I did. In April this Diverdun went to travel with a young English gentleman, and a few days afterwards a Swiss clergyman delivered to me from him his Memoirs for the year 1768; he published but one before, for 1767. In this new journal I found a criticism on my Historic Doubts, with note? by Mr. Hume, to which the critic declared he gave the preference. Mr. Hume had shown me the notes last year in manuscript, but this conduct appeared so paltry, added to Mr. Hume's total silence, that I immediately wrote an answer, not only to these notes, but to other things that had been written against my Doubts. However, as I treated Mr. Hume with the severity he deserved, I resolved not to print this answer, only to show it to him in manuscript, and to leave it behind as an appendix to, and confirmation of, my Historic Doubts.
About-the same time Voltaire published in the Mercure the letter he had written to me, but I made no answer, because he had treated me more dirtily than Mr. Hume had-Though Voltaire, with whom I had never had the least acquaintance or correspondence, had voluntarily written to me first, and asked for my book, he wrote a letter to the Duchess of Choiseul, in which, without saying a syllable of his having written to me first, he told her I had officiously sent him my Works, and declared war with him in defence de ce bouffon Shakspeare, whom in his reply to me he pretended so much to admire. The Duchess sent me Voltaire's